Beechtree Cantina, Hyannis, MA

24 07 2012

Jalapeno & Pineapple Margarita, $12

Beechtree Cantina’s location is so picture-perfect that they could serve piles of steaming trash and I would still go, just to sit outside around the magnificent, weeping English beech tree out back. Frozen drinks and a scaled-down version of their full menu are served in the backyard courtyard. This was where we started the night, drinking margaritas and debating if we should stay here for dinner or walk down Main St. and check out other options. But after seeing a pile of nachos stacked so high they were about to topple, we decided to stay.

We grabbed a table in the outdoor seating area of their main restaurant and ordered a couple more drinks. The pineapple jalapeno margarita tastes like a spicy & fruity salsa. Really liked it. My boyfriend ordered the Spicy Cucumber Margarita ($10) and wasn’t as impressed. It tasted like someone accidentally knocked over a salt shaker into it. The last inch of the drink was undrinkable because it was so salty.

Guacamole, $12

Usually I don’t order table-side guac. Waitresses hate to make it and it’s always terribly over-priced. But I saw it made at the next table and decided to get all crazy. AND BOY AM I GLAD I DID; huge bowl and you get to choose from a plentiful selection of ingredients.

Fish Tacos, $16

Now vegetarian reader, I hate to break it to you, but within the past year I have started to work seafood back into my diet. Mainly just because of the fact that I friggin’ love food and I get incredibly bored with the strict vegetarian options on most menus (i.e. pasta primavera, quesadillas, frozen veggie burgers, etc) Fish tacos are one of my new favorites and the ones at Beechtree are definitely up there with some of the best. The fish was very fresh and flavorful, topped with shredded cabbage and pico de gallo, though the accompanying confetti rice and tequila black beans were lacking in spice.

Pollo Tostados, $12

Ryan really enjoyed these pulled chicken tostadas, topped with arugula, carmelized onions, goat cheese and avocado with an ancho crema.

So Beechtree joins the swarm of upscale Mexican restaurants that are popping up in the area and I for one am pretty psyched for it. Main Street Hyannis definitely needed a place like this since the other option for Mexican/margaritas does not cut the mustard. The drinks are innovative, the food is bright and fresh and the location has been added to my mental list of what defines a Cape Cod summer.

Beechtree Cantina
599 Main Street
Hyannis, MA, 02601
508-534-9876

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Fail

4 11 2010

Was going to put up a post about a Tahini pasta with broccoli that came out really good, but I failed at taking pictures so I’ll just save an update until I have something more cohesive to give you. In the mean time, here’s something that I definitely won’t blog about. A baked banana with yogurt and cinnamon. I can’t take it seriously. Enjoy it in all of its dick-turd glory.





Banana Almond-Butter Muffins

7 10 2010

I’m impartial to muffins. Really, I don’t care. Maybe because I was raised in a house where muffins appeared twice a year, if we’re lucky, in blueberry form, from a pouch of muffin mix. We don’t celebrate the muffin or sing the muffin electric. So I do believe, this may have been the first time that I’ve ever had the inclination to say out loud at around 10 pm on a Monday night, “Hey! … I’m gonna bake some muffins.”

I browsed through one of my favorite food sites, eat me, delicious and found something with ingredients I had and something sort of autumn-y; Banana Peanut Butter Muffins. I changed the recipe around a little bit and used almond butter instead, threw in some chopped walnuts, and some ground golden flaxseed, just because it was there. I baked them, and I guess I can say, I’m still not celebrating muffin-dom. It’s going to take a whole lot more baking to make me feel at ease with them, but I like these. They’re not too sweet, which makes them more accessible. I feel good and healthy when I eat one for breakfast or snatch one up as a snack before work. A good rustic muffin. I’m satisfied 🙂

Banana Almond-Butter Oatmeal Muffins
Adapted from eat me, delicious

1 1/2 cups whole wheat flour
1 cup oats
1 tsp. baking powder
1/2 tsp. baking soda
1/2 tsp. salt
2 tbs. vegetable oil
1/2 cup brown sugar
2 large eggs
3/4 cup mashed banana (about 2 medium-sized bananas)
1/2 cup natural almond butter (or peanut butter)
1 cup buttermilk (or make your own with 1 cup milk and 1 tb. white vinegar)
1 tb. ground flaxseed (optional)
1/3 cup chopped walnuts (optional)

Preheat oven to 375. Lightly grease a 12-cup muffin tin.

In a large bowl, whisk together flour, oatmeal, baking powder, baking soda and salt.

In a medium bowl, whisk together vegetable oil, brown sugar, eggs, mashed banana, almond butter, flaxseed, walnuts, and buttermilk until very smooth, making sure all egg has been well-incorporated. Pour into flour mixture and stir until no streaks of flour remain.

Divide batter evenly into prepared muffin tin, filling each just about up to the top.

Bake for 16-20 minutes, until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean and the top springs back when lightly pressed.

Remove muffins from tin and cool on a wire rack.





Evo: Worcester, MA

28 07 2010

Evo
Worcester, MA


     I’m trying to figure out when I became the type of person who orders wine with their meal. I mean, I originally wanted to buy a bottle and just have a wine-drunk dinner, which is a lot more acceptable than simply sipping an over-priced glass for the sheer aesthetics of it. But after skimming the per-bottle prices, which were decent let me say, I remembered that I’m not Trumpin’ It and money is an issue, so I settled back into being a one-drink-dink and what looked to me like a sample tasting, of an organic Chardonnay.

Keep On Readin’!





Garlic Beet Greens

25 07 2010

I grew these! With my bare hands, muahahaha. But really though. The first fruits of labor from a dinky lil’ porch garden are these beet greens. My expectations weren’t high. I imagined grass-like flavors with a stringy, tough stalk. But lo, was I wrong.
Keep on’ readin!





Moussaka

18 07 2010

 
Fresh off the bus from Boston, I knew I had to cook something. I’m usually at work until 9:30 on Tuesdays, but had gotten it off so I could go meet up with Ryan and visit his father who was visiting from Florida. It was a solid day. Started off with an adorable Jewish grandmother feeding us Kugel in Stoughton, progressing along the outer towns of Boston and culminating in a trip to Fanueil Hall where I was whisked away to la-la land by a raspberry smoothie, and proceeded at an attempt to barter with a gift shop boy selling the cutest Piggy socks I’ve ever seen. Reaching for my wallet, almost paying $10.99 for a pair of socks, I mentally slapped myself and went back to the fam who thought I had just gone to the bathroom. Later that evening, Ryan, his brother Adam, and myself went to the Why? concert at the Middle East in Cambridge. Sufficiently buzzed, covered in the sweat of others, head throbbing to the monotone beats, I was happy. And that’s where I found myself yesterday, minus the buzz but still, unshowered and encrusted with hot show goodies. Getting off the bus around dinner time, I knew I had to make something. That’s where I was going with this. Moussaka. And my first vegan cookbook. But one of the best. A recipe I haven’t made since high school that had been stored away in my brain as I hunted for another vegan moussaka recipe that may come close. Haven’t found another one so, as is life, we’re back full circle. So throw on Eskimo Snow and let this recipe take you away. Each component a delicate and fragrant entity. From the paprika & cayenne dredged eggplant to the sauce that smells like a Grecian outdoor market, it’s bliss.   
 
 
Moussaka

Adapted from Tofu & Soyfoods Cookery

1 large eggplant, peeled & sliced
1/3 cup white flour
1 tsp. paprika
½ tsp. salt
1/8 tsp. cayenne
Tomato Sauce:
1 tb. olive oil
1 large onion, chopped
1 can stewed tomatoes
½-1 cup water
2 tbs. fresh parsley, minced
1 tsp. oregano
1 tsp. basil
½ tsp. cinnamon
½ tsp. nutmeg
½ tsp. salt
Creamy Topping:
1 lb. firm tofu
¼ cup olive oil
¼ cup nutritional yeast
½ tsp. salt
Juice of 1 lemon (2 tbs.)
1 cup bread crumbs
Place the eggplant slices in a large, shallow dish, sprinkling each layer with salt. Place something on top to weight them down, such as a heavy pan or a teakettle. Let the slices set for 30 minutes, then rinse and pat dry with a paper towel.
Combine the flour, paprika, salt, and cayenne in a bowl and dredge the eggplant slices. Heat a skillet with oil and fry the eggplant slices until lightly browned on either side (about 1-2 minutes). Arrange the fried slices in a baking pan.
To make the sauce, sauté the onion in the olive oil until soft. Puree the stewed tomatoes, parsley, oregano, basil, cinnamon, nutmeg and salt in a blender and add to the onion. Simmer the sauce for a few minutes to blend the flavors.
To make the creamy topping, combine all the ingredients in a blender until smooth and creamy. Preheat the oven to 350.
Assemble the moussaka. Pour the sauce over the eggplant slices and cover with bread crumbs. Spread the creamy mixture evenly on the top with a spatula. Bake for about 50 minutes, until the top is a light golden brown. Let the moussaka stand for 10 minutes after it comes out of the oven.